• default style
  • blue style
  • green style
  • red style
  • orange style

New Azerbaijan

USA's Modern Warships

LG Curved OLED TV

Facebook Data Center

Crosswind Landings

کتاب دانش - Ketabe Danesh

Written by Frank Devlon. Posted in Technology & Science

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive

Written by Frank Devlon. Posted in Technology & Science

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive
 
   

How do we know where we are? How can we find the way from one place to another? And how can we store this information in such a way that we can immediately find the way the next time we trace the same path?

This year´s Nobel Laureates have discovered a positioning system, an “inner GPS” in the brain that makes it possible to orient ourselves in space, demonstrating a cellular basis for higher cognitive function.

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded with one half to John O´Keefe and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.

Inner GPS
Prof O'Keefe, from University College London, discovered the first part of the brain's internal positioning system in 1971. On hearing about winning the prize, he said: "I'm totally delighted and thrilled, I'm still in a state of shock, it's the highest accolade you can get."

His work showed that a set of nerve cells became activated whenever a rat was in one location in a room. Continue reading the main storyStart Quote A different set of cells were active when the rat was in a different area. Prof O'Keefe argued these "place cells" - located in the hippocampus - formed a map within the brain.

He will be having a "quiet celebration" this evening and says the prize money "should be used for the common good".

Mapping

In 2005, husband and wife team, May-Britt and Edvard, discovered a different part of the brain which acts more like a nautical chart. These "grid cells" are akin to lines of longitude and latitude, helping the brain to judge distance and navigate. They work at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. 

Written by Frank Devlon. Posted in Technology & Science

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive
 
 

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy".

Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner are awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for having bypassed a presumed scientific limitation stipulating that an optical microscope can never yield a resolution better than 0.2 micrometres.

Using the fluorescence of molecules, scientists can now monitor the interplay between individual molecules inside cells; they can observe disease-related proteins aggregate and they can track cell division at the nanolevel

The prize was announced by Staffan Normark, Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.



Written by Frank Devlon. Posted in Technology & Science

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive
 
 

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 was awarded jointly to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources".

The laureates triggered a transformation of lighting technology when they produced bright blue light from semiconductors in the 1990s, something scientists had struggled with for decades, the Nobel committee said.

Using the blue light, LED lamps emitting white light could be created in a new way.

The prize was announced by Staffan Normark, Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

 

Written by Frank Devlon. Posted in Technology & Science

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactiveStar inactive
 

 
HTC RE camera, the first foray into the post-mobile world from the Taiwanese manufacturer. It's a small, handheld camera with a 16MP sensor that can shoot on its own, or connect to an Android device or iPhone for tethered shooting.

FOBO Tire

How Robots Will Change the World

Largest Submarine in The U.S. Navy

SSI Shredding Systems

IKEA app

Future Intelligence

World's most expensive shower

Ketabedanesh Youtube

Bicycle Navigation

YTY Group glove manufacturing

Decorative Candles

Thechnolog & Sciense

Who's online?

We have 170 guests and no members online

Search site. . .

Translate this site

English Finnish French German Hebrew Italian Japanese Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish Swedish

Airbus A380

 

Wet animals shake in slow motion

Let's print a hart!

Human Meets Humanoid

This is SIEMENS!

This is KUKA!

Water Balloon!

Hydropower generator

Feeds with robotic arm!

Microsoft future technology

Links

Did U know?

Boeing 747-400

Jumbo Jet Engine

Japanese Bullet Train